Considerations When Planning a Home for Your Child with a Disability

Posted by Patty Manko on Thu, Oct 01, 2015 @ 05:48 PM

Screen_Shot_2015-09-15_at_3.12.55_PM-1When planning a home for an individual with disabilities, the cost of the physical housing is many times a surprisingly small percentage of the total expense.There are 2 primary factors to consider in planning for lifetime residential options for your child with disabilities.  

  1. Supports required - the level of assistance your child needs in order to manage their day to day activities.
  2. Your financial resources.

Assessing & Planning for Supports

Supports an individual may require for daily living ranges from individuals with medically complex situations (requiring assistance in all activities) to individuals in need of minimal supports.  

Once you have identified the level of support your child requires, you must next determine the level of staffing necessary to provide this support.  Staff is usually the largest expense to be considered when quantifying the cost of your child’s residential options.  There are planning techniques that may be used to maintain the level of services your child requires and contain the costs within your budget.  One example of this is to find opportunities to change the ratio of staff to individuals.   Since the quality of a program depends on the support staff, establishing the optimum ratio requires skill and experience.

Planning for a Rich & Meaningful Life

Most importantly, the goal of planning should be to reach beyond your child’s baseline needs and provide the opportunity for an enriched and meaningful life for them. This goal requires a great deal of time and garnering of resources. 

There is no one-size-fits-all best solution for all families. Your investment in a residence for your child is a factor in your own personal tax, retirement and estate planning. The key is to determine the best situation for you and your family as a whole.  

Contact us  to find out more  about our upcoming   Housing Presentations.

 

Tags: Housing

Housing Options for an Individual with Disabilities

Posted by Patty Manko on Thu, Sep 11, 2014 @ 05:12 PM

house-resized-600When planning a home for an individual with disabilities it is often a surprise that the physical housing is many times a very small percentage of the expense. The 2 primary factors in planning for lifetime residential options for your child with disabilities are:

  • the level of assistance they need in order to manage their day to day activities
  •  your own financial situation.

 The support an individual may require ranges from medically complex situations or individuals requiring assistance in all activities of daily living to individuals in need of minimal supports.  

Once you have identified the level of support required, you must determine the level of staffing necessary to provide this support.  Staff is usually the largest expense to be considered when quantifying how much your child’s residential options will cost.  There are planning techniques that may be used to maintain the level of services your child requires and contain the costs within your budget.  One example of this is to find opportunities to change the ratio of staff to individuals.   Since the quality of a program depends on the support staff, establishing the optimum ratio requires skill and experience.

Most importantly, the goal of planning should be to reach beyond your child’s baseline needs and provide for them an opportunity for an enriched and meaningful life.  To learn about planning for residential needs in a more comprehensive manner, consider attending the Statewide, Buyilding a Home conference (details below).

Click on the notice below for more information about the Building a Home conference.

 

Screen_Shot_2014-09-11_at_5.02.25_PM

Tags: Housing

Housing for People with Disabilities

Posted by Patricia Manko on Fri, Jun 28, 2013 @ 02:31 PM

describe the image
 Read Our Story of Creating a Home for our Son

When planning a home for an individual with disabilities, the cost of the physical housing is many times a surprisingly small percentage of the total expense.

There are 2 primary factors to consider in planning for lifetime residential options for your child with disabilities.  They are:

  • Supports required-the level of assistance they need in order to manage their day to day activities
  •  Your financial resources

Assessing Supports

The support an individual may require ranges from medically complex situations or individuals requiring assistance in all activities of daily living to individuals in need of minimal supports.  

Once you have identified the level of support required, you must determine the level of staffing necessary to provide this support.  Staff is usually the largest expense to be considered when quantifying how much your child’s residential options will cost.  There are planning techniques that may be used to maintain the level of services your child requires and contain the costs within your budget.  One example of this is to find opportunities to change the ratio of staff to individuals.   Since the quality of a program depends on the support staff, establishing the optimum ratio requires skill and experience.

Planning for  a Rich & Meaningful Life

Most importantly, the goal of planning should be to reach beyond your child’s baseline needs and provide for them an opportunity for an enriched and meaningful life. This goal requires a great deal of time and garnering of resources. We are working at this goal right now and you may find it helpful to read about the process we have employed in planning for a home for our son James, in our blog, Diary of a Dream

There is no one-size-fits-all best solution for all families. An investment by parents in a residence in which their child will live is a factor in their own personal tax, retirement and estate planning. The key is to determine the best situation for you and your family. If you have questions regarding your own individual situation, please give us a call.

Contact us

Tags: Housing, Special Needs Financial Planning

Planning for Life after Special Education in Massachusetts

Posted by Patricia Manko on Thu, Jan 10, 2013 @ 03:19 PM

spec needs teen

A Full Life AHEAD

Massachusetts Families Organizing for Change (MFOFC), in partnership with Massachusetts Down Syndrome Congress (MDSC), will host a series of monthly workshops for parents and guardians of young adults with a disability.  The series will focus on transition, employment, housing and other topics that will help to give them interdependent full lives in their community.

Please join the first workshop on

Wednesday, January 30, 2013  

     “Planning for Life after Special Education

 in Massachusetts”

 

                                                          7:00 – 9:00 PM

MDSC Office 

20 Burlington Mall Road -- Suite 261

Burlington, MA 01803

 

Pamela Coveney Senior Attorney, Co-Team Leader of the Disability Law Center (DLC) Education Team, will discuss the several substantial topics included in the latest edition of “Planning for Life after Special Education in Massachusetts”.  Read and download this free manual at http://www.dlc-ma.org/_manual/LASE_manual.htm

 

This workshop will identify specific suggestions on how to develop comprehensive post-secondary vision statements, IEPs and transition plans, developing appropriate transition services for students, knowing various diploma options, best practices for family involvement and more.

Please RSVP to snadworny@riversidecc.org

** Mark your calendars** 

The next two workshop dates will be scheduled for February 20 and March 20.

 

Tags: Housing, Special Needs Financial Planning, friendship, disability legislation

Special Needs Presentations for 2013

Posted by Patricia Manko on Thu, Jan 03, 2013 @ 05:27 PM

We are currently scheduling presentations for 2013.  Please contact us to arrange a date. We have three presentations currently available: 

Presentation 1:

describe the imageA Family Centered Approach to Special Needs Financial Planning

All too often families are presented with the same solution to address the unique circumstances of their own personal situation. There is a great deal of information about planning for "when you are gone" or "who will care for them when you die". The use of a Special Needs Trust and funding it with life insurance is only one solution. Realizing this, it is important to develop workshops to educate and address the issues that families face at different points in their lifetime.

We plan to finance the vision families have for their loved one.  We do this through comprehensive financial planning including asset management, life insurance and the monitoring and coordination of government services.


Presentation 2:

describe the image“Creating a Home for a Lifetime”

Residential Planning for Individuals with Special Needs Transitioning to Adulthood

This presentation outlines a process a family may follow to evaluate the housing alternatives most appropriate for their child transitioning to aulthood. The presentation is meant to elaborate on the Special Needs Planning Housing Checklist, our exclusive resource.  

 

Presentation 3:

No Sibling Left Behind

describe the imageA presentation done in conjuction with the MA Sibling Support Network (MSSN). To read more about Siblings, click here to see our October Newsletter, Planning is a  Family Matter. The first presentation is Thursday, January 10th at the Sudbury Senior Center conference room, 40 Fairbank Road in Sudbury, MA at 7:30. Click here to register

 

 

If you are interested in a presentation or additional information on any of thes topics ,please contact us .

Tags: Housing, Special Needs Financial Planning, Life Insurance

Special Needs Financial Planning Newsletter

Posted by Patricia Manko on Wed, Oct 24, 2012 @ 06:08 PM

Click on the icon below to download our October newsletter featuring

  • Planning is a Family Affair: Coming of Age as a Brother or Sister of a Person with Disabilities
  • Our new, exclusive SNFP Housing Checklist
  • Tips to help people with autism and their families have happy holidays

SNFP Logo resized 600

 

 

Tags: Housing, Special Needs Financial Planning, autism

Achieving a Milestone: Closing Monson

Posted by Patricia Manko on Wed, Sep 05, 2012 @ 01:07 PM

                         Register now! MA Families Organizing for a Change 

The Closing of Monson Developmental Center

At 11:30 AM on August 30, 2012 a landmark moment occurred when the last resident left the Monson Developmental Center. Monson and other Massachusetts institutions, the Fernald Center for example, were built over 100 years ago with the purpose of providing services to people with disabilities in a large, centralized setting.

Large-scale institutions are no longer considered best practice for people with developmental disabilities, and most recent growth in long-term care across the United States has occurred in community-based settings. Existing empirical evidence overwhelmingly indicates that people with developmental disabilities living in community-based settings have significantly better outcomes across a range of psychosocial and behavioral domains than those who are institutionalized (Apgar,Lerman & Jordan, 2003; Larson & Lakin, 1989, 1991; Racino & Taylor, 1993) ¹

Over the last several years, the Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS) has been working diligently to transition individuals from various institutions. Although some chose to move to another institution, at least they were presented the option and opportunity to live in a community setting. DDS should be commended for their diligence and commitment to providing quality services to all individuals, as it has been a challenging process.

The closing of Munson is clearly cause for celebration and paves the way for the real celebration when The Fernald School is closed as well. Although the legal battle continues with the Fernald closing, the end is near!

¹ Parish, S., Lutwick, Z. (2005). A Critical Analysis of the Emerging Crisis ion Long-Term Care for People with Developmental Disabilities, Social Work, Volume 50, Number 4
.

Tags: Housing

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