For Grandparents: Save for Retirement and Grandchildren’s Education

Posted by Haddad Nadworny on Sat, Jan 13, 2018 @ 07:36 AM

The Special Needs Financial Planning Team  Cynthia Haddad, CFP | John  Nadworny, CFP | Alexandria Nadworny, CFP  We are committed to offering educational workshops to organizations and parent  groups.  Please call Alex or click here to attend a workshop or discuss a presentation  to your group.


pexels-photo-355948.jpegA Roth IRA may be an option for grandparents to consider when saving for retirement and while also saving for their grandchildren’s education. The Roth IRA allows account owners to save with tax-free growth* and with the added flexibility to allocate and use the funds when they choose and for any purpose.

What is a Roth IRA:

 A Roth IRA is a retirement account funded with after-tax dollars. The contributions generally are not tax deductible but when you start withdrawing funds, qualified distributions are tax-free.

 Defining characteristics of a Roth IRA:

  • The money invested in a Roth grows tax-free*.
  • Contributions can continue to be made once the taxpayer is past the age of 70½, as long as he or she has earned income, which may be basically defined as W2 income.
  • Eligibility for a Roth account depends on taxable income.       Generally, in 2018 you are eligible if :
  • you are a couple filing jointly and your MAGI (modified adjusted gross income) is less than $189,000.
  • you file as an individual and your MAGI is $133,000.
  • Contribution amounts: In 2018 an individual may make an annual contribution of up to $5,500 to a Roth IRA. Individuals who are age 50 and older by the end of the year for which the contribution applies can make additional catch-up contributions (up to $1,000 in 2018). An individual may also establish a Roth IRA for their spouse with little or no income.
  • The taxpayer can maintain the Roth IRA indefinitely; there is no required minimum distribution (RMD) during the account holder's lifetime.

* Withdrawals from the account may be tax-free, as long as they are considered qualified. Limitations and restrictions may apply. Withdrawals prior to age 59 ½ or prior to the account being opened for 5 years, whichever is later, may result in a 10% IRS penalty tax.

Case Study

John and Alice (fictional names) are grandparents of 2 grandchildren, one of whom has special needs.  John and Alice have $10, 000/year to contribute toward their retirement savings should an emergency or unforeseen need arise. They also want the opportunity to put these funds toward the goal of funding their grandchildren’s educational expenses and don’t want to miss this opportunity to save for them should the unforeseen or emergency never happen.

 Their first thought was to establish a 529 plan & ABLE account for each of their grandchildren. However, while John and Alice feel saving for college is an important goal toward which they want to contribute, they need and want flexibility and control over these funds. Their grandchildren may opt not go to college or John and Alice may have an unforeseen need come along for which they would use this savings. 

In meeting with John and Alice and discussing this goal, we suggested another alternative: establishing and funding a Roth IRA. This alternative is open to John and Alice as they both have earned income, file taxes jointly and do not exceed the $189,000 combined household maximum income threshold for Roth IRA contributions. There is no age limitation on opening or contributing to a Roth IRA.

The benefits of saving the $10,000/year in a Roth IRA are tax-free growth, with no limitations on use of funds or withdrawal rules( with exceptions noted above- see *).  John and Alice may each contribute up to $5500/ year to a Roth IRA. Today they feel as though they can afford to give their grandchildren money for their futures, but ideally John and Alice would like the option to have the money available to them if there was an unforeseen need. Should they have additional grandchildren, having the money in the Roth IRA can make it easier to distribute the money amongst all grandchildren.

 Potential drawbacks to using this approach might occur if the funds were left in the account and John and Alice required nursing care. This savings would be considered in their assets and also, should they pass away, this account would be included as a part of their estate assets. To control disposition of the assets upon their death, they may designate their children or grandchildren as beneficiaries of the account.

When making the decision of how best to save for your grandchild’s future, recognize that every family’s situation is different and that will have an impact on the final decision regarding the best savings option to consider.    

Content in this material is for general information only and not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual, nor intended to be a substitute for individualized tax advice. There is no assurance that the techniques and strategies discussed are suitable for all individuals or will yield positive outcomes. Please consult tax advisor regarding your specific situation.The Roth IRA offers tax deferral on any earnings in the account. Future tax law can change at any time and may impact the benefits of Roth IRAs. Their tax treatment may change. The experiences described here may not be representative of any future experience of our clients, nor considered a recommendation of the advisor’s services or abilities or indicate a favorable client experience. Individual results will vary.

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Tags: planning for college, financial planning, Retirement Planning, Special Needs Financial Planning

Retirement Accounts and Special Needs Trusts

Posted by Patty Manko on Thu, Feb 20, 2014 @ 04:51 PM

 


Beneficiary Designations on Retirement Accounts


At the death of the owner of an IRA or company-sponsored retirement plan, the proceeds are distributed according to the beneficiaries that are listed when the application is signed. Generally speaking, if you are married, your spouse is usually listed as the primary beneficiary. At the owner's death, the spouse will be able to transfer the assets into a spousal IRA rollover. This will enable the spouse to defer the taxes until the funds are withdrawn from the account. If you are not married and your intent is for an individual with a disability to receive any portion of the IRA, it is recommended to have those proceeds paid to a trust that has special needs provisions. 

If a special needs trust is used as the beneficiary of a retirement plan account, the income earned in the trust will be taxed to the trust, usually at a higher tax bracket than an individual tax bracket. The proceeds from a Roth IRA are distributed tax free upon death of the owner. If an owner has a Roth IRA in addition to other retirement accounts, it may be advantageous to have the special needs trust named as beneficiary of the Roth IRA and the other children named as beneficiaries of the other IRA and retirement plan assets.

It is not recommended to have an individual with disabilities named individually as the beneficiary of the traditional IRA or Roth IRA, because an account balance greater than or equal to $2,000 will disqualify him or her for government benefits. Instead, if the owner wants the value of all or a portion of the IRA to be received by a person with disabilities, that person's special needs trust should be named as one of the beneficiaries.

Special Needs Planning Pointer

If you have more than one child and you intend to split your retirement account between all the children, including your child with special needs, you should direct his or her share in the beneficiary designation to the special needs trust. An example would be to have Adam Miller name his wife, Justine, as his primary beneficiary. He would then name two of his children, Kyle and Alyssa, as contingent beneficiaries, each to receive 33% of the retirement account; and he would name the special needs trust created for his third child, Alexia, as a third contingent beneficiary to receive the remaining 34% of the retirement account. Adam would list the special needs trust for Alexia on his beneficiary designation form by including the proper registration, "The Alexia Miller Special Needs Trust Dated January 1, 2007."

Read a Whitepaper from the Special Needs Alliance: Government Benefits and Special Needs Trusts

Tags: Retirement Planning, Special Needs Trusts, financial planning

Financial Factors in Special Needs Planning

Posted by Patricia Manko on Thu, Feb 28, 2013 @ 03:09 PM

financial factors Starting at a very young age we are taught about the value of money. Throughout our lives we associate the value of money to our life experiences such as paying for our own college education, purchasing a car, buying a house, saving for our own children’s college and our ultimate retirement – in addition to the daily expenses of our desired lifestyle.

Your Family's Financial Values or Standards

It is important to talk about the value of money and what it means to you because you can pass these values on to future caretakers and other family members. How you feel about money can also have an impact upon what you can achieve for your child's future. It does not do any good if you do not share your values of money with others. If parents do not articulate their vision, their financial capacity to achieve their goals and their financial intentions, their vision for their child may not happen. It is important to express your values to your financial advisors, trustees, guardians, and legal advisors, but also to your other family members. These individuals most likely will be the ones to follow through on implementing the plan that you have for your child.

SNP PLANNING POINTER:

Take a moment to ask yourself – What does money mean to me? Then take time to share those values with your family –this can be expressed in your Letter of Intent.

 Download a template for your Letter of Intent

Bringing Family Members into Your Discussions

There are many ways to discuss your vision and your finances. It is often easiest to begin this process in a gradual manner and in an informal environment. Although it is important to have all family members in agreement, scheduling initial discussions in a formal meeting or large family setting is not always the best. We recommend speaking to one child at a time, to get their feelings about their willingness to help. This will give them the opportunity ti share ideas with you rather than you telling them what you hope will happen. Remember, caring for a family member with disabilities is a lifetime commitment that you do not want to force on anyone, yet it is important for them to know your intentions.

After everyone has had an opportunity ti discuss tghuer feelings and ideas un and informal way, you may wish to plan a discussion wuth everyone at once.  Since every family’s dynamics are unique, you will find the best way to communicate with your family. The following steps should help to move the communication process along smoothly:

  • Share your vision
  • Talk about the amount of money you plan to have available to support your vision. You do not have to reveal all of your financial matters. You can choose to only mention the financial aspects that pertain to the needs of the family member with a disability.
  • Determine the best person to take on each role. For example, who is the best with finances? That person may be a good trustee or trust advisor of a Special Needs Trust. Who is most involved in the day to day life of the child? That person may be a good guardian.
  • Ask family members if they feel able to perform their roles independently. If not,design your plan to give them resources to work with. For example, let them know that they could hire an investment advisor to help with the trust management or a social worker to help oversee supports.

In our combined 30-plus years of planning, one of the biggest obstacles that we have encountered is that people do not feel comfortable talking about how much money they have. Even professionals in the field of providing services to families, including government agency employees that serve families, do not feel comfortable talking about money or the specific costs of providing services to individuals with disabilities. 

SNP STORY:

Although Charles is receiving all the benefits that he is eligible for and living independently, we feel that it is not enough for him to simply have what the government provides. We supplement his expenses by about $1,000 a month. This gives him the sense of self-worth and control to be able to do what he likes rather than do what someone else wants him to do. He has schizophrenia and his sense of self-worth is most important to his ability to function in life. In working with our financial planner and our attorney, we made arrangements for our other son to provide this supplement to support Charles’ needs without jeopardizing his government benefits when we are no longer able to. 

-- Charles’ father

Sometimes parents feel that they must treat all of their children equally. They feel that their children expect it. However, in many cases children without disabilities are more than willing to forego any type of inheritance to guarantee security for their brother or sister with  a disability. They understand the financial realities and would rather make sure their brother or sister is taken care of and would not expect that everything is shared equally.

One of the first steps that is required for you to be able to achieve financial security for your child is to overcome the reluctance to discuss the issues of money. We all know it takes money to provide services, staff, housing expenses, employment supports, transportation, education, health care services and the like. We also know that the government does not have an endless supply of money to funed these services.

Maximize Eligibility for Government Benefits

With this in mind, families should plan to maximize eligibility for governmenaboutof what funds are available to your family member– both personally and publicly –how to secure them and how to allocate them. We will be posting a blog about public resources, which we call government factors,  within the next few weeks.

Understand Where You Are and Where You Would Like to Be

In order to maximize your own personal resources, you must first understand where you are financially. Do you have the money to do the things you and your family like to do today? Are you happy where you are financially? If not, what can you do to change things?

The next step is to know where you want to be. What lifestyle do you envision for you and your family, today and in the future? What do you consider retirement – is it when you stop working full time, when you stop working the hours that you currently work, or when you begin to work part time or pursue a hobby for income?  What do you want to do for your vacations, travel time, fun time, and the like?  How philanthropic do you want to be? Where do you envision living when you retire?  In what type of environment do you envision your child living ?  Do you envision him or her living totally independent from you or do you intend to always be involved in the daily activities of your child's life for as long as you are able to?

Create a Plan

The next step is to prepare an action plan to get you where you want to be financially. This is where having qualified advisors to guide you through the planning process can be most beneficial.

The key issue to consider in the financial factors is maximizing personal resources. This includes maximizing tax planning strategies – both income tax and estate tax planning. The proper use of financial products can also be a key factor to financial success. You should also incorporate your group employee benefits in the planning process.  These would include your group health, life and disability insurance coverage,retirement plans, stock option plans, stock purchase plans, flexible spending plans, etc..  Determine those that are currently available to you and your family as well as those available to your family upon your death and /or retirement.  You should also determine which employee benefits are transferable and/or portable upon  termination of your employment.  Adequately protecting your income and assets in the event of a premature death and/or disability of a parent is critical.

Any type of planning process, from planning a vacation to building a house, has a defined beginning and ending point. The traditional financial planning process involves identifying resources and listing specific goals that can be quantified. Some common examples of quantifiable goals might include paying cash for your next automobile, saving for four years of college tuition payments ,purchasing a second home for retirement, or generating a retirement income equal to 65%-75% of your pre-retirement income.

Planning for a family member with disabilities can be a much more challenging process. There is no defined beginning or ending point. Needs and abilities of the individual can change rapidly and will vary significantly over time. It is only natural for the family of a young child to want to have a concrete plan in place that provides adequate assets and resources for their child’s lifetime needs. Families must realize, however, that it may not be possible to predict accurately the long-term costs involved in providing supports for an individual over his/her lifetime.

Assumptions can be made of future expenses. We can fairly accurately determine the costs of a physical residence – a house or a condo – in a geographic area based on current market values. We can also estimate the costs of maintaining the physical residence. Often, however, we cannot always accurately determine the costs of supports until the needs are identified. Once the needs are somewhat identified, we can develop a range of the probable expenses necessary to provide these supports today and in the future. Before implementing a residential plan it is highly recommended that you work with an independent consultant to determine the level of supports required. You then need to develop a model that meets both your personal preferences and your financial abilities to maintain the model, both during your lifetime and upon your death.

So how do we determine how much money is needed? And how much is too much? Just as the educational needs of every child are unique, so are the long-term planning needs of every individual with special needs. Even two individuals with a similar medical and/or cognitive diagnosis, can have significantly different support requirements. With these varying requirements, costs will also vary. There is no clear answer; the bestwe can do is to maximize all resources and coordinate all of the Five Factors.That is why it is so important to have a comprehensive plan and to reevaluate it periodically.

Tags: Special Needs Financial Planning, Special Needs Trusts, financial planning, Retirement Planning, Letter of Intent, special needs Letter of Intent, wealth management, guardianship, Trustee Services, five factors of financial planning

Prioritizing Goals for Your Child with Disabilities - Part II

Posted by Patricia Manko on Tue, Jul 24, 2012 @ 04:21 PM

describe the image
Defining Planning Timeframes

 

Having a child with special needs re-defines the classical financial planning terms of short, intermediate and long-term planning goals. 

In planning for a child with disabilities, we often look at things differently.  

    Goal Planning Timeframe

Traditional

Special Needs

Short

<5 years

immediate 

Intermediate

5-10 years

goal with quantifiable timeframe

Long

>10 years

two generations

  

Defining Traditional Planning Goals:

The relevance in defining a goal as either a short, intermediate or long-term goal is that it helps you to

  1.  Prioritize the order of each goal 
  2.  Determine a plan of action
  3.  Establish benchmarks to measure if you are achieving your goals.
  4.  Determine the most appropriate financial and legal tools to be used  to achieve each goal

Determining the appropriate Investment Objective

Each goal whether short term, intermediate, or long term requires a careful analysis of the needs and the savings available to achieve this goal based upon the time remaining until the invested funds are needed.

For short term needs, planning is focused on having adequate liquid savings for emergencies and unexpected expenses.  A simple rule of thumb is to have 3 to 6 months of living expenses available in the bank and/or equivalent.  Although liquid savings tend to have lower rates of return, they provide safety of principal.  The key is to receive a return OF the money, not necessarily to have a return ON the money. 

For intermediate term needs, planning is focused on accumulating savings in non-retirement accounts that can be accessed without having to pay a penalty.  The investment objective is primarily focused towards growth, with a secondary objective of safety of principal.

For long-term needs that are earmarked to be available during your retirement years, planning is generally focused on accumulating savings in retirement plan accounts.  The investment objective is primarily focused toward growth of principal. 

Defining Special Needs Planning Goals:

 For a typical family, an intermediate term savings goal is generally paying for college tuitions,  which are often a 4 year commitment. For special needs planning, an additional intermediate term savings goal might be purchasing a home for your child with disabilities. Defining the specific dollar amount required to purchase a home can vary dramatically from state to state, from family to family and from child to child. However, it is important to at least establish a base line for which to plan. To define the amount of savings needed to achieve this goal, many financial planners would use the model of purchasing a condominium unit. The purchase of the physical structure is basically the same with some variatons in structure or layout based on the child’s abilities. The primary distinction would be to anticipate any requirements for any significant modifications to the home to meet the needs of the individual. Nonetheless, these are definable intermediate goals.

 Continuing to provide for the lifetime supports required to enable your child with disabilities to live away from you in a separate residence are considered long term savings goals. Regardless of the number of years until the child moves into the residence, the support needs are for his or her lifetime. In developing the long-term planning strategy, the long-term support needs of your child should be integrated within your personal long-term cash flow needs. In planning ahead, this involves increasing your cash flow needs during your retirement years by the estimated amount of money required to support your child in his or her residence.

 For example, in traditional retirement planning it is frequently recommended to establish your retirement income goal to be 75% of your preretirement expenses. In supporting the lifetime needs of your child, his or her additional estimated expenses should be added to your own  retirement income goal.

 

 

 

 

Tags: Special Needs Financial Planning, Retirement Planning, Housing

Retirement Account Beneficiaries and Special Needs Trusts

Posted by Patty Manko on Tue, Apr 03, 2012 @ 01:32 PM

Beneficiaries
Beneficiary Designations on Retirement Accounts
At the death of the owner of an IRA or company-sponsored retirement plan, the proceeds are distributed according to the beneficiaries that are listed when the application is signed. Generally speaking, if you are married, your spouse is usually listed as the primary beneficiary. At the owner's death, the spouse will be able to transfer the assets into a spousal IRA rollover. This will enable the spouse to defer the taxes until the funds are withdrawn from the account. If you are not married and your intent is for an individual with a disability to receive any portion of the IRA, it is recommended to have those proceeds paid to a trust that has special needs provisions.

If a special needs trust is used as the beneficiary of a retirement plan account, the income earned in the trust will be taxed to the trust, usually at a higher tax bracket than an individual tax bracket. The proceeds from a Roth IRA are distributed tax free upon death of the owner. If an owner has a Roth IRA in addition to other retirement accounts, it may be advantageous to have the special needs trust named as beneficiary of the Roth IRA and the other children named as beneficiaries of the other IRA and retirement plan assets.

It is not recommended to have an individual with disabilities named individually as the beneficiary of the traditional IRA or Roth IRA, because an account balance greater than or equal to $2,000 will disqualify him or her for government benefits. Instead, if the owner wants the value of all or a portion of the IRA to be received by a person with disabilities, that person's special needs trust should be named as one of the beneficiaries.
Special Needs Planning Pointer

If you have more than one child and you intend to split your retirement account between all the children, including your child with special needs, you should direct his or her share in the beneficiary designation to the special needs trust. An example would be to have Adam Miller name his wife, Justine, as his primary beneficiary. He would then name two of his children, Kyle and Alyssa, as contingent beneficiaries, each to receive 33% of the retirement account; and he would name the special needs trust created for his third child, Alexia, as a third contingent beneficiary to receive the remaining 34% of the retirement account. Adam would list the special needs trust for Alexia on his beneficiary designation form by including the proper registration, "The Alexia Miller Special Needs Trust Dated January 1, 2007."

Tags: Special Needs Trusts, Retirement Planning

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